Children & Adolescents
  • Individual Therapy
  • Play Therapy
  • Social Skills Building
  • Emotional Regulation Skills
  • Coping Skills
  • Family Conflict
  • Trauma Work
  • Anxiety and Depression
  • Grief and Loss Support
  • Conflict Resolution Skills
The Power of Play

 

Why Play?

In recent years a growing number of noted mental health professionals have observed that play is as important to human happiness and well-being as love and work (Schaefer, 1993). Some of the greatest thinkers of all time, including Aristotle and Plato, have reflected on why play is so fundamental in our lives. The following are some of the many benefits of play that have been described by play theorists. 

Play is the child's language and ...

Play is a fun, enjoyable activity that elevates our spirits and brightens our outlook on life. It expands self-expression, self-knowledge, self-actualization and self-efficacy. Play relieves feelings of stress and boredom, connects us to people in a positive way, stimulates creative thinking and exploration, regulates our emotions, and boosts our ego (Landreth, 2002). In addition, play allows us to practice skills and roles needed for survival. Learning and development are best fostered through play (Russ, 2004).

 

*Source: Association for Play Therapy (http://www.a4pt.org)

 

How Does It Work?

Children are referred for play therapy to resolve their problems (Carmichael; 2006; Schaefer, 1993). Often, children have used up their own problem solving tools, and they misbehave, may act out at home, with friends, and at school (Landreth, 2002). Play therapy allows trained mental health practitioners who specialize in play therapy, to assess and understand children's play. Further, play therapy is utilized to help children cope with difficult emotions and find solutions to problems (Moustakas, 1997; Reddy, Files-Hall, & Schaefer, 2005). By confronting problems in the clinical Play Therapy setting, children find healthier solutions. Play therapy allows children to change the way they think about, feel toward, and resolve their concerns (Kaugars & Russ, 2001). Even the most troubling problems can be confronted in play therapy and lasting resolutions can be discovered, rehearsed, mastered and adapted into lifelong strategies (Russ, 2004).

*Source: Association for Play Therapy (http://www.a4pt.org)

© 2017 by The Lindemann Counseling Center

* cited from the Association for Play Therapy website (http://www.a4pt.org)

* cited from  the AUTPLAY® THERAPY website (http://www.autplaytherapy.com)